Wisdom at ESPN

He wrote: "because that's the way our society works now: We embrace something new, digest it, beat it into the ground and move on to something else. One minute, "Borat" is the greatest comedy of all-time; the next minute, it's overrated. One minute, everyone loves "Lost"; the next minute, we're wondering if it jumped the shark. One minute, everyone loves The Killers; the next minute, they're self-important sellouts. It's the Everything Sucks Era. We spend an inordinate amount of time bitching about everyone else. Nobody's good, nobody's worthwhile and everybody needs to go away. That's the prevailing theme."

And he followed with, "We spend so much time complaining about underachieving superstars, overpaid and overhyped players, incompetent GMs, rookie flops, dreadful officiating, troublemakers, thugs, players and coaches doing/saying dumb things, bad trades and signings, annoying announcers and writers, and overrated teams getting too much credit — by the way, I do as much complaining and mocking as anyone, I'm not absolving myself here — that I'm starting to wonder if we'll ever fully embrace a special team anymore. Are we too cynical? Are we too desperate to poke fun at everything?"

<<Bill Simmons' article>>

Considering the tenor of my past two postings, this was a well timed read for me. Yeah, why complain so much? Why? BECAUSE IT'S SO DAMNED EASY!!!!!!!!!!!

That's the only excuse I can come up with.

So, in this new light, and given a recent turn in my own perspective on creative production, and living in general, it is time shed the contrarian nature, and only beef about something if I have something better to add, or a truly plausible solution.

Of course I'll have the occassional rant where I pose no solution, but just as Bill Simmons pointed the finger at himself for his own mistakes, I'll make sure to label the postings as venting, contrarian rants — just so you know what you're getting ahead of time.

And isn't it time we start looking at everything we have going for ourselves instead of the couple of things standing in our way — even if those one or two things seem implausibly large and daunting?

It's a beautiful journey we're all on — life that is.